Tuesday, February 24, 2009

Walking His Talk



Bryan Steeman had his St.-Paul-on-the-road-to-Damascus moment in a little taco joint in Mexico. It was full of life, a gathering place for the community and a vortex for good vibes. And he knew right then that he'd come back to Portland and recreate that same vibe here, with a green and socially conscious edge. Are we lucky or what?

You can read my article about him in today's Oregonian in an article titled "Tale of a Tacqueria."

7 comments:

Rebecca/CUpS said...

Looks like a great little place - and I love hearing about all the sustainable things they are doing. And getting healthcare for the crew - awesome! Now I'll just cross my fingers and hope after #2 becomes a hit, that Mr. Steelman might consider all the hungry folks on the SW part of town. Por que no?!

kab said...

In the meantime, get thyself over there and check it out. You guys will love it (on so many levels)! And let us know what you think...

Meg said...

AND, if all the great stuff KAB wrote about isn't reason enough to freqent Por Que No, they also support charitable giving within the community when they can. All the important ingredients for a terrific place to eat...

kab said...

Thanks, Meg! It's a real privilege to write about such a great business. And wonderful that they take their role in the community so seriously.

Scott Lansing said...

Great article. The slideshow was awesome, too. You managed to capture my favorite restaurant in Portland incredibly well and also provided insight on the health benefits and sustainable attributes I didn't know about. Makes me like Por Que No even more.

Anonymous said...

And yet, you (intentionally, no doubt) forgot to include the most important issue: For mucho dinero, one gets very small tacos. That is a disservice to your readers. "Por Que No?" is presently a novelty and write-ups such as yours will certainly help business but just like Ascholls Pizza up the street, the economy will surely catch up with it. The average person like me and my amigos, would rather go down to Cha' Cha' Cha' and get a mongo burrito filled with natural beef, chicken or pork for $4.50.

Ami Cote'

kab said...

Actually, the point of the article was to talk about how one business is trying to model local and sustainable practices while providing healthy food in a fun atmosphere, and how difficult that can be for a small business vis-a-vis the LEED certification system. A price/volume comparison with other restaurants wasn't part of that discussion.